A Year in Review: 2014

At the risk of my “year in review” posts being my most frequent kind of post, here is a quick round-up of 2014, so I can move on to my next most frequent post, my Academy Award predictions for the Costume Design category.

In February I started off making my first vintage-inspired piece, a skirt based on McCalls 6667 from 1946. I didn’t actually have the pattern or anything I just made is after being inspired a picture of the pattern I found through a random Google search.

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In March I visited the Downton Abbey exhibit at the Spadina House. And in April I attended Costume Con 32, sporting a vintage look (including my 1946 skirt above).

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In July we took a cruise to Iceland and Norway and stopped off for a few days in London. I was able to sneak in a little costume spying too. Including most notably a trip to the V&A for the exhibit: “The Glamour of Italian Fashion – 1945-2014“. Unfortunately no photos (or sketching!) allowed.

In September I made the Bluebird nurse’s uniform. And the missing collar and cuffs were added in October. Also in October I made a Halloween costume, for the annual dance I attend, that intertwined a Venetian masquerade ballgown style with Marie from the Aristocats.

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And I got to don my 1912 dress again for the annual Haunted event. This time with wig and fur.

Bryan and Nicole, inside, Haunted Mississauga 2014

In November I helped celebrate local history by donning an 1812 dress. This one wasn’t made by me, but I put together the turban-style headpiece to match.

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In November and December I made two museum costumes one 1830s dress and one WWI era. These combined Past Patterns and original pattern drafting by me.

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And post-Christmas I bought a pair of Miss L Fire 1940s-inspired heels to continue my foray into making vintage a larger part of my wardrobe.

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In the meanwhile, we also bought and moved into our first house and adopted two kitties. And I started a dress that’s still lost in the packed boxes.

It was a busy year, but here’s to a much busier next year. (And I think it will be, because I’ve already completed a 1940s plaid skirt and 90% completed a Vionnet-inspired gown! Hurray!)

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A Brief History of Snow White

We are now a few days into October, or as I prefer to view it, the Halloween season. (Hallo-month?) I love Halloween as a costumer and I also hate it. Allow me to elaborate. In August my cousin asked me what I was going to be for Halloween. I replied that I didn’t know yet. (I did.) In turn, I asked him what he was going to be, to which he exclaimed: “Are you crazy? It’s August!” I’m sure he’ll be deciding the day before.

Well those of us with slightly greater ambitions than the popular trend of the week need to start planning a little earlier, even if it is crazy. As an aside, did anyone notice a striking number of Grease costumes – my cousin included – last year? Hurricane Sandy was also getting a lot of airtime that week.

In March, while I was in Walt Disney World, I spotted a print in an Art of Disney store. It was a very regal looking Snow White, I’m guessing from after her Happily Ever After. Queen Snow White here is not in her simple dress from the movie, but a rather more historical mishmash of a gown, puffed out and bejeweled up. How exciting! I snapped a photo of the print, thinking it was merely interesting. Well, now I wish I’d just bought it, because it wasn’t that expensive and, more importantly, I’ve decided I’m going to recreate that gown.

I’ve been scouring the internet trying to get an artist for this print. According to two ebay listings and a tumblr post it is titled “Friends of the Forest” by John Coulter.

“Friends of the Forest” by John Coulter

A Brief History of Snow White:

I decided it might be interesting to delve a little deeper into the history of the Snow White character, to be learn more about her origins and by association what she might have been wearing.

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